jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.

There are still relatively few women in physics – and the higher up the ladder in academia or industry you go, the fewer women you find. Yet the laws of physics themselves are gender neutral, and the beauty of the universe is equally accessible to everyone. So why so few women, and how can we change that?

Shohini Ghose (via infinite-incendio)

brightestofcentaurus:

Lagoon Nebula
The Lagoon Nebula, Messier 8, is a star forming region located about 5,000 light years away towards the constellation Sagittarius. The majority of the radiation illuminating the brightest region of the nebula comes from Herschel 36, an O-type star in the center of the area. The extended region is ionized by other hot stars.
These stars are part of the embedded open star cluster NGC 6530. Extreme stellar winds and intense radiation from these stars shape the surrounding material, creating the hourglass shape near the center of this image. The region is also shaped by the temperature difference between the hot interior and the cold exterior of the gas clouds, which create a tornado-like shape in the nebula.
Image from NASA, information from NASA and HubbleSite.

brightestofcentaurus:

Lagoon Nebula

The Lagoon Nebula, Messier 8, is a star forming region located about 5,000 light years away towards the constellation Sagittarius. The majority of the radiation illuminating the brightest region of the nebula comes from Herschel 36, an O-type star in the center of the area. The extended region is ionized by other hot stars.

These stars are part of the embedded open star cluster NGC 6530. Extreme stellar winds and intense radiation from these stars shape the surrounding material, creating the hourglass shape near the center of this image. The region is also shaped by the temperature difference between the hot interior and the cold exterior of the gas clouds, which create a tornado-like shape in the nebula.

Image from NASA, information from NASA and HubbleSite.

thedemon-hauntedworld:

CG4: A Ruptured Cometary Globule 
The “claw” of this odd looking “creature” in the above photo is a gas cloud known as a cometary globule. This globule, however, has ruptured. Cometary globules are typically characterized by dusty heads and elongated tails. These features cause cometary globules to have visual similarities to comets, but in reality they are very much different. Globules are frequently the birthplaces of stars, and many show very young stars in their heads. The reason for the rupture in the head of this object is not completely known. The galaxy to the left of the globule is huge, very far in the distance, and only placed near CG4 by chance superposition.
Image Credit & Copyright: Jason Jennings (cosmicphotos)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

CG4: A Ruptured Cometary Globule

The “claw” of this odd looking “creature” in the above photo is a gas cloud known as a cometary globule. This globule, however, has ruptured. Cometary globules are typically characterized by dusty heads and elongated tails. These features cause cometary globules to have visual similarities to comets, but in reality they are very much different. Globules are frequently the birthplaces of stars, and many show very young stars in their heads. The reason for the rupture in the head of this object is not completely known. The galaxy to the left of the globule is huge, very far in the distance, and only placed near CG4 by chance superposition.

Image Credit & Copyright: Jason Jennings (cosmicphotos)

spaceplasma:

Millisecond Pulsars

As the name suggestions, millisecond pulsars have pulse periods that are in the range from one to ten milliseconds. Most such millisecond pulsars are found in binary systems, typically with white-dwarf companions. These pulsars are highly magnetized, old neutron stars in binary systems which have been spun up to high rotational frequencies by accumulating mass and angular momentum from a companion star. Neutron stars form when a massive star explodes at the end of its life and leaves behind a super-dense, spinning ball of neutrons. A pulsar is the same thing as a neutron star, but with one added feature. Pulsars emit lighthouse-like beams of x-ray and radio waves that rapidly sweep through space as the object spins on its axis. Most pulsars rotate just a few times per second, but some spin hundreds of times faster. These millisecond pulsars are the fastest-rotating stars we know of.

To hear the sound of a pulsar, click here
Credit: NASA
Zoom Info
spaceplasma:

Millisecond Pulsars

As the name suggestions, millisecond pulsars have pulse periods that are in the range from one to ten milliseconds. Most such millisecond pulsars are found in binary systems, typically with white-dwarf companions. These pulsars are highly magnetized, old neutron stars in binary systems which have been spun up to high rotational frequencies by accumulating mass and angular momentum from a companion star. Neutron stars form when a massive star explodes at the end of its life and leaves behind a super-dense, spinning ball of neutrons. A pulsar is the same thing as a neutron star, but with one added feature. Pulsars emit lighthouse-like beams of x-ray and radio waves that rapidly sweep through space as the object spins on its axis. Most pulsars rotate just a few times per second, but some spin hundreds of times faster. These millisecond pulsars are the fastest-rotating stars we know of.

To hear the sound of a pulsar, click here
Credit: NASA
Zoom Info

spaceplasma:

Millisecond Pulsars

As the name suggestions, millisecond pulsars have pulse periods that are in the range from one to ten milliseconds. Most such millisecond pulsars are found in binary systems, typically with white-dwarf companions. These pulsars are highly magnetized, old neutron stars in binary systems which have been spun up to high rotational frequencies by accumulating mass and angular momentum from a companion star. Neutron stars form when a massive star explodes at the end of its life and leaves behind a super-dense, spinning ball of neutrons. A pulsar is the same thing as a neutron star, but with one added feature. Pulsars emit lighthouse-like beams of x-ray and radio waves that rapidly sweep through space as the object spins on its axis. Most pulsars rotate just a few times per second, but some spin hundreds of times faster. These millisecond pulsars are the fastest-rotating stars we know of.

  • To hear the sound of a pulsar, click here

Credit: NASA