uglyboyzclub:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

uglyboyzclub:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

spaceplasma:


Our Sun constantly emits plasma which moves out in all directions at very high speeds and fills the entire solar system. The complex interaction between the Sun’s plasma atmosphere and its magnetic field gives rise to a wide range of fascinating and spectacular phenomena. The fluctuation of the sun’s magnetic fields can cause a large portion of the outer atmosphere to expand rapidly, spewing a tremendous amount of particles into space. These large eruptions of magnetized plasma are called coronal mass ejections. CMEs are the most spectacular and potentially harmful manifestations of solar activity. Some of these eruptive events accelerate particles to very high energies, high enough to penetrate a space suit or the hull of a spacecraft and can cause severe disturbances in the geospace environment when they encounter Earth’s magnetic field. However, only about 1% of the CMEs produce strong SEP (solar energetic particles) events. 

Watch the video on the NASAexplorer YouTube channel
Credit: NASA/SDO/Duberstein
Zoom Info
spaceplasma:


Our Sun constantly emits plasma which moves out in all directions at very high speeds and fills the entire solar system. The complex interaction between the Sun’s plasma atmosphere and its magnetic field gives rise to a wide range of fascinating and spectacular phenomena. The fluctuation of the sun’s magnetic fields can cause a large portion of the outer atmosphere to expand rapidly, spewing a tremendous amount of particles into space. These large eruptions of magnetized plasma are called coronal mass ejections. CMEs are the most spectacular and potentially harmful manifestations of solar activity. Some of these eruptive events accelerate particles to very high energies, high enough to penetrate a space suit or the hull of a spacecraft and can cause severe disturbances in the geospace environment when they encounter Earth’s magnetic field. However, only about 1% of the CMEs produce strong SEP (solar energetic particles) events. 

Watch the video on the NASAexplorer YouTube channel
Credit: NASA/SDO/Duberstein
Zoom Info

spaceplasma:

Our Sun constantly emits plasma which moves out in all directions at very high speeds and fills the entire solar system. The complex interaction between the Sun’s plasma atmosphere and its magnetic field gives rise to a wide range of fascinating and spectacular phenomena. The fluctuation of the sun’s magnetic fields can cause a large portion of the outer atmosphere to expand rapidly, spewing a tremendous amount of particles into space. These large eruptions of magnetized plasma are called coronal mass ejections. CMEs are the most spectacular and potentially harmful manifestations of solar activity. Some of these eruptive events accelerate particles to very high energies, high enough to penetrate a space suit or the hull of a spacecraft and can cause severe disturbances in the geospace environment when they encounter Earth’s magnetic field. However, only about 1% of the CMEs produce strong SEP (solar energetic particles) events. 

Credit: NASA/SDO/Duberstein

jtotheizzoe:

thebrainscoop:

Science Needs Women: 
For Women in Science; the L’Oreal Foundation 

I’m sharing this video on any platform I can because when I first found it last week it had something like 1,400 views, but it’s the most beautifully produced and succinctly narrated video addressing some of the most complicated issues facing women in STE(A)M fields I’ve found yet. 

I’m sharing this for every time I’m called a “feminazi.”

…for every time I’m told that my concerns aren’t valid, our that our issues are imagined.

…for every time I hear “women just don’t like science,” or worse - “women just aren’t good at science.”

…for every time we’re told that we can have a family or a career, but not both - and for every time we feel like we have to decide between the two.

…for every time a study comes out saying as many as 64% of women endure sexual harassment during field work

…for the fact that women earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields.

…and because we need more women mentors in these fields to stand up for issues that are not “women’s issues” - these are people issues that affect our collective society as a whole.

The women in this video are my heroes and they should be your heroes, too.

Science needs women.

There are still relatively few women in physics – and the higher up the ladder in academia or industry you go, the fewer women you find. Yet the laws of physics themselves are gender neutral, and the beauty of the universe is equally accessible to everyone. So why so few women, and how can we change that?

Shohini Ghose (via infinite-incendio)

brightestofcentaurus:

Lagoon Nebula
The Lagoon Nebula, Messier 8, is a star forming region located about 5,000 light years away towards the constellation Sagittarius. The majority of the radiation illuminating the brightest region of the nebula comes from Herschel 36, an O-type star in the center of the area. The extended region is ionized by other hot stars.
These stars are part of the embedded open star cluster NGC 6530. Extreme stellar winds and intense radiation from these stars shape the surrounding material, creating the hourglass shape near the center of this image. The region is also shaped by the temperature difference between the hot interior and the cold exterior of the gas clouds, which create a tornado-like shape in the nebula.
Image from NASA, information from NASA and HubbleSite.

brightestofcentaurus:

Lagoon Nebula

The Lagoon Nebula, Messier 8, is a star forming region located about 5,000 light years away towards the constellation Sagittarius. The majority of the radiation illuminating the brightest region of the nebula comes from Herschel 36, an O-type star in the center of the area. The extended region is ionized by other hot stars.

These stars are part of the embedded open star cluster NGC 6530. Extreme stellar winds and intense radiation from these stars shape the surrounding material, creating the hourglass shape near the center of this image. The region is also shaped by the temperature difference between the hot interior and the cold exterior of the gas clouds, which create a tornado-like shape in the nebula.

Image from NASA, information from NASA and HubbleSite.